Saturday, June 20, 2009

Stop Animal Exploitation NOW! (SAEN) - How You Can Help

Stop Animal Exploitation NOW! (SAEN) - How You Can Help

PLEASE FOLLOW LINK FOR PETITIONS, LINKS & OTHER RESOURCES.

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National Primate Research Center System - Stop Animal Exploitation NOW! (SAEN)


THE FACTS YOU ARE NOT SUPPOSED TO KNOW...

National Primate Research Center System - Resources and Links From Stop Animal Exploitation NOW! (SAEN)








ONLY MONSTERS COULD DO THIS...




(Eating in Chair -1) Common sense tells us that a monkey would not want to be clamped into a chair, such as this one, any more that we would. Thus, the researchers often deprive the monkey of food prior to being clamped into the chair. Then they feed the monkey when he or she is in the chair, so that the monkey will associate being fed with being in the chair, and give the researchers fewer problems.




Stop Animal Exploitation NOW!




To test the effects of burns, this dog was burned alive at the Shriner's Hospital, Cincinnati, USA. Photo courtesy of P.E.T.A. (1980's-1990's)

S. A. E. N. Stop Animal Exploitation Now!
S.A.E.N. Exposing the truth to wipe out animal experimentation. Working to end the exploitation and vivisection (experimentation or testing) of animals. Primates (apes, baboon, macaque, monkeys...), cats, dogs, goats, iguanas, guinea, mice, monkeys, pigs, rabbits, rats, squirrels, horses, birds, cow, pigs, turtles, snakes...



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PETA TV // Animal Rights TV

PETA TV // Animal Rights TV


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Wednesday, June 17, 2009

In Search of 'Mamiwata'

In Search of 'Mamiwata'

Mamiwata is an African name for a spirit believed to be embodied by the manatee. This blog chronicles the search for the elusive West African manatee, and an exploration to understand its biology, habitat and preservation needs, economic and cultural significance. So little is known about this animal, yet it is intensely hunted almost everywhere it exists and may already be gone from much of its previous range.

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Tuesday, June 16, 2009

Raising the Donkey, JB

Raising the Donkey, JB
an orphaned baby donkey grows up

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Conservation program looks after mountain gorillas, human neighbors





Mountain gorillas are threatened by war, poaching, decreasing habitat, and infection from ecotourists.

The University of California-Davis has started the Mountain Gorilla One Health Program in the School of Veterinary Medicine's Wildlife Health Center.

The new program partners with the Mountain Gorilla Veterinary Project, established in 1986 by the Morris Animal Foundation at the request of primatologist Dian Fossey. The veterinary school initiative will support gorilla conservation by addressing human health, livestock health, and agricultural issues in the central Africa region where the gorillas live.

The MGVP's longtime director, Dr. Michael Cranfield, has joined the UC-Davis staff and will continue to oversee the work of the project's seven veterinarians and 12 technicians and staff members in Rwanda, Uganda, and the Democratic Republic of the Congo.

"The collaboration with UC-Davis will help improve the health and welfare of the humans and animals living around the gorillas," Dr. Cranfield said. "This in turn acts as a buffer to help prevent disease—the gorillas' leading cause of death—from entering the park and affecting gorilla families."

The Mountain Gorilla One Health Program will investigate disease threats facing mountain gorillas, help expand medical care for the humans working in and around the gorilla parks, and improve the health and well-being of livestock to benefit the families who depend on them for nutrition and income.

It is expected that the program will create expanded research opportunities for UC-Davis veterinary, medical, and graduate students at the university and in the gorillas' habitat. The program will also allow veterinary staff and biologists from Rwanda, Uganda, and the Democratic Republic of the Congo to obtain advanced clinical and scientific training.

Combined with antipoaching patrols and habitat-protection efforts of the Rwandan, Ugandan, and Congolese governments and other organizations, the Mountain Gorilla Veterinary Project's medical program has helped increase the number of mountain gorillas by 17 percent during the past decade, making the mountain gorilla the only wild great ape whose numbers are rising.

"Over the years, several faculty members here at UC-Davis have been integral to the conservation of mountain gorillas, so it feels very fitting that UC-Davis form this partnership with the Mountain Gorilla Veterinary Project," said Dr. Bennie I. Osburn, dean of the UC-Davis SVM.

Mountain gorillas remain extremely vulnerable. They live in a fragmented habitat surrounded by the densest human populations in Africa. Their forests are sometimes in war zones and are cut down for production of charcoal. They fall victim to snares set by poachers for gorillas and other "bush meat" animals such as small antelope and monkeys.

Gorilla ecotourism is an important source of revenue for the communities that surround the parks in which the gorillas live, but the gorillas sometimes range outside park boundaries and raid farmers' crops.
And since gorillas and humans are so closely related genetically, gorilla health is strongly influenced by the health of people working and living nearby, and even by ecotourists, who come within 20 feet of gorilla families. Veterinarians are particularly worried that people could transmit common colds, measles, or other illnesses to the gorillas.

"The complexity of the issues surrounding mountain gorilla health and conservation spurred the Mountain Gorilla Veterinary Project to seek new ties with an academic institution that could provide expertise in human medicine, veterinary medicine, and agriculture," said Dr. Kirsten Gilardi, assistant director of the veterinary school's Wildlife Health Center and head of the Mountain Gorilla One Health Program. "UC-
Davis was the perfect fit."

The Mountain Gorilla One Health Program is made possible by $750,000 in funding from the David and Lucile Packard Foundation.


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Global Action Network: Cruelty-Free Shopping: Vegan Health and Beauty

Global Action Network: Cruelty-Free Shopping: Vegan Health and Beauty


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Sunday, June 14, 2009

The Australian Orangutan Project » ape safe wood

The Australian Orangutan Project » ape safe wood A guide to buying ape safe timber products:

Logging is the biggest threat to the survival of the orangutan and many other species - consumer demand drives this trade.

Where does your paper or timber products come from?

One Stop Timber Shop - One stop guide to forest-friendly and recycled timbers

The Wilderness Society - A new guide to the best and worst paper (in terms of environmental impact).

Greenpeace - We can make a difference for the forests, and the environment, by making the right choice when we buy or use these products.

Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) - The goal of the FSC is to promote environmentally responsible, socially beneficial and economically viable management of the world's forests by establishing a worldwide standard of recognised and respected Principles of Forest Stewardship.

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The Australian Orangutan Project » home

The Australian Orangutan Project » home
Bulletin:
Many of you may be aware of the current media coverage surrounding a proposal by timber giant, Asia Pulp & Paper, to clear 33,776 hectares of forest in Bukit Tigapuluh, Sumatra, Indonesia. This devastating proposal will severely endanger the 100 orangutans released in the park to date via the Bukit Tigapuluh Sumatran Orangutan Reintroduction Project – the only reintroduction site for this critically endangered species.

We call for immediate support on this issue and encourage members of the public to write a letter to Asia Pulp & Paper, requesting a withdrawal of its proposal. A letter template can be accessed here, or you can sign our online petition here.

We thank you for your help and support. Don't know much about Palm Oil? Click here for the complete guide

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Orangutans in danger - Stop palm oil

Stop Logging Indonesian Rainforest and Endangered Orangutan Habitat

PETITION!
Stop Logging Indonesian Rainforest and Endangered Orangutan Habitat
http://www.orangutan.org.au

A proposal for further forest clearing and destruction of over 33,600 ha of rainforest has recently been put forward by a joint venture company, Asia Pulp & Paper/Sinar Mas Group.

The Bukit Tigapuluh (“Thirty Hills”) ecosystem is located in Central Sumatra, Indonesia. This globally important ecosystem provides a safe haven for many species which are threatened by extinction or are extremely rare - including the critically endangered Sumatran orang-utan, tiger and elephant.

Over 100 orangutans have been released to date via the Bukit Tigapuluh Sumatran Orangutan Reintroduction Project – the only reintroduction site for this critically endangered species. It took scientists decades to discover how to successfully reintroduce critically endangered orangutans from captivity into the wild and it could take APP just months to destroy an important part of their new habitat

Between 1985 and 2007, Sumatra island lost 12 million hectares of natural forest, a 48 percent loss in 22 years. By 2007, the island had only 30 percent natural forest cover (around 13 million hectares).The Indonesian Ministries of Forestry, Environment, Public Works and Interior, as well as the governors of all 10 Sumatran provinces, including Jambi, last year announced their collective commitment to protecting the areas of the island with “high conservation values.”

The natural forest slated for destruction by APP – Bukit Tigapuluh – is a prime example of the high conservation value areas that the governors promised to protect. If the APP proposal for pulp paper production is accepted is will destroy the forest home of many species, and clearing on the ground could start as soon as 2010

Many environmental NGOs and Government organisations work in the landscape (including WARSI, the Sumatran Tiger Conservation and Protection Foundation, Frankfurt Zoological Society, Zoological Society of London, WWF and the Australian Orangutan Project). Several Australian Government and NGOs also financially support the landscape including the Australian Orangutan Project, Human Society International (Australia), Perth Zoo, Auckland Zoo, Adelaide Zoo, Australia Zoo, and Dream World. Hundreds of individual Australians also provide financial support for the Park’s protection through the Australian Orangutan Project’s Safe Guard Program.

Protecting the Great Apes - Perth Rally, May 30
http://www.westtv.com.au/?vxSiteId=43c6a3c7-abf1-4c32-b98d-c27f8fa83360&vxChanne l=News&vxClipId=1416_WAU2623&vxBitrate=300

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NASA photos reveal destruction of 99% of rainforest park in Rwanda

NASA photos reveal destruction of 99% of rainforest park in Rwanda


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Donkey Rescue

Donkey Rescue: "Peaceful Valley Donkey Rescue is the largest donkey rescue in the United States with facilities located all across the country. Peaceful Valley is dedicated to improving the plight of the American Donkey through rescue, safe capture, sanctuary and education.

Peaceful Valley is home to hundreds of abused, neglected domestic donkeys that have suffered terrible things at the hands of cruel owners. Peaceful Valley is also the country's leading non-profit animal rescue in the safe capture and removal of wild burros under threat of destruction.

The Peaceful Valley Donkey Rescue is an IRS recognized 501(c)(3) non-profit charitable organization and depends entirely upon the public for its support. Peaceful Valley has used the donations that it has received and literally saved thousands of lives. Without this crucial support, we could not continue our work."


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