Thursday, April 6, 2017

What if we gave universal income to people in biodiversity hotpots? | Environment | The Guardian

What if we gave universal income to people in biodiversity hotpots? | Environment | The Guardian  Human nature isn’t driving mass extinction – as some have argued – but our acceptance of capitalism is, according to English Professor Ashley Dawson with the City University of New York whose recent book, Extinction: A Radical History, lays out the case how our current global economic system is pushing Earth ever closer to a mass extinction event.


Capitalism as species-eater:  Around 500 years ago, Europeans brought about the invention of modern day capitalism, a system that was rooted in colonialism, slavery and environmental destruction, according to Dawson.

“Capitalism is an economic system founded on ceaseless expansion,” Dawson, who specializes in Postcolonial studies, said. “It must grow at a compound rate or it will experience convulsive economic and social crises. The contradictions of this system are patently self-evident: an economic system based on infinite expansion must inevitably crash into the natural limits of finite ecosystems.”

Below: A man in Zimbabwe poses with a pangolin under his care at the The Tikki Hywood Trust. Today, the pangolin, which comprises eight species, is the world’s most trafficked animal
A man in Zimbabwe poses with a pangolin under his care at the The Tikki Hywood Trust. Today, the pangolin, which comprises eight species, is the world’s most trafficked animal.